Tel: +86-13223745050    E-mail: alphatoysfactory@gmail.com
  Video     Our Team    FAQ
News center
You are here: Home » News » Science Classroom » Alpha science classroom: DIY Ring on the Resonance

Alpha science classroom: DIY Ring on the Resonance

Views:5     Author:Site Editor     Publish Time: 2022-01-07      Origin:Site

Have kids ever been on a swing and suddenly noticed that the person on the swing next to you seems to be swinging almost exactly in sync with you? Here's why. Today, Alpha science classroom is going through the Ring on the Resonance activity with this physical science experiments activity for kids. It will help children learn simple physics and understand more about this amazing planet through these fun kid's science experiments!

Alpha Science Classroom: DIY Ring on the Resonance, Materials Needed

  • Scissors

  • 4 sheets of construction paper (preferably four different colors)

  • Duct tape

  • A piece of cardboard (about 5 x 12 inches)

  • Ruler

Alpha Science Classroom: DIY Ring on the Resonance, step-by-step instruction

Step 1: Children, cut seven vertical strips (about an inch wide) from construction paper; cut two strips from the first three colors and one strip from the fourth color.

Step 2: Children connect strips of the same color with tape to form three long strips, each about 22 inches long.

Step 3: Children will keep one strip 22 inches long. Trim about 3 inches from the second strip and 6 inches from the third. Add the long strip cut from the fourth sheet and you should have four strips of paper that are. 22, 19, 16, and 12 inches long.

Article 4: Children glue the ends of each strip of paper together to form a loop. Attach the loops to the cardboard strips, leaving at least two inches between each strip.

Alpha Science Classroom. DIY ring on resonance, step-by-step instruction

Step 1: Children, cut seven vertical strips (about an inch wide) from construction paper; cut two strips from the first three colors and one strip from the fourth color.

Step 2: Children connect strips of the same color with tape to form three long strips, each about 22 inches long.

Step 3: Children will keep one strip 22 inches long. Trim about 3 inches from the second strip and 6 inches from the third. Add the long strip cut from the fourth sheet and you should have four strips of paper that are. 22, 19, 16, and 12 inches long.

Step 4: Children glue the ends of each strip of paper together to form a loop. Attach the loops to the cardboard strips, leaving at least two inches between each strip.

Step 5: The children place the ruler on a flat, clear surface. Then place your cardboard (with rings) on the same surface, perpendicular to your ruler, so that the short end of the cardboard is almost touching the ruler. Align one edge with the three-inch mark on the ruler.

physical-science-experiments

Step 6: Children gently move the cardboard about two inches along the length of the ruler and then move it back again. Do this slowly a few more times. As you move the cardboard, notice the movement and shape of each paper loop. Are all of the paper rings moving? Are some rings moving more than others? Which ones are moving the most? Which ones move the least? How does the shape of the paper ring change as you move the cardboard?

Step 7: Children repeat this action in its entirety, but this time move the cardboard slightly faster. Once again, notice how the paper rings change as you move the cardboard. Do the different paper rings move when you increase the speed? What happens to the shape of the paper ring when you increase the speed of the cardboard? If more than one paper ring is moving, are they moving together (in sync)? Do any of the rings not move? How did their shape change?

Step 8: Children repeat this movement, slowly increasing the speed at which they move the cardboard. Make sure to keep the movement to within two inches. Each time you increase the speed of the movement, notice the effect on the rings. Notice if the rings are moving and if their shape changes as your speed increases. Continue to increase the speed, trying to get all the rings to move. Which ring is the last to move? Which ring is the first to move? How does the movement of the larger ring change as you increase speed? How does the motion of the smaller ring change when you increase the speed? How does the shape of the rings change when you increase the speed of movement? Are you able to make all the rings move back and forth at the same time?

Step 9: The children try to find the resonance or "favorite" frequency of each ring. Increase and decrease the speed at which you move the cardboard and observe where each ring looks most excited, where the movement of that ring is stronger and clearer than the other rings. Test to see if you can find a speed where only the smallest ring is moving, and then see if you can find a speed where only the largest ring is moving. Test to see if you can find a speed where all the rings are moving together. Which ring seems to move the most at the lower speed? Which one moves the most at a higher speed?

Step 10: The children repeat this activity, but this time tries moving the cardboard back and forth in six-inch increments. Pay close attention to what happens to the ring as you slowly increase the speed of movement. When you move the cardboard six inches, which ring moves first? When you move the cardboard to two inches, the first to move the same ring? When you increase the distance of movement, what happens to the shape of the ring? When you move the cardboard back and forth six inches, is it easier or more difficult to get all the rings to move?

Finally, children repeat this activity, moving the cardboard back and forth 9 inches, then 12 inches. Note which rings move first and which rings move last at each distance. Also, note the shape of the rings and how they change as you move the cardboard faster over each length. How does the size of each ring relate to the distance moved?

Alpha Science Classroom: DIY Ring on the Resonance, Science Principles

The alpha science classroom asks the kids if they notice that at each distance, each ring seems to have a favorite speed, one in particular that the ring seems to have stronger motion than the other rings? This is what we would expect to see. The largest ring has the most mass, it is also the softest (or least stiff). As a result, the largest ring may be more dynamic than the others as you slowly move the cardboard around. In contrast, the smallest ring has the least mass and is the least floppy (or stiffest). As a result, the smaller ring has a higher resonant frequency and is the most dynamic when you move the cardboard faster.

If you test different speeds of motion, you may notice that at least some of the rings have more than one resonant frequency. For example, when you move the cardboard slowly, the large ring vibrates strongly, but when you speed up, it doesn't move as well. Then, when you go fast enough, the big ring seems to start moving again! This is because the big ring (like many people) vibrates at a high frequency. This is because the ring (like many objects) has multiple resonant frequencies. However, if you look closely, you will see that the shape of the big ring is different at low resonant frequencies than it is at high resonant frequencies. At low frequencies, it flattens out, while at high frequencies, it may almost look like a square

As you increase the distance of the movement, the resonant frequency does not change, but it may be easier to see how the ring changes shape with the movement. If you move the cardboard up and down, you may notice that the rings follow this motion - instead of moving from one side to the other, they seem to get thin and fat. The largest ring still has the lowest resonant frequency, but you may notice that it's a little harder to get the smallest ring to move compared to when you move the cardboard sideways. This is because as you move the cardboard up and down, the cardboard adds its own stiffness to the rings, making them less flimsy in that direction.

The children discovered the scientific principle of resonance, which is the reason why we can hear beautiful music when playing the guitar, and they can also witness this amazing phenomenon through different children's physical science experiments. discover more interesting knowledge and grow up to be the smartest scientists.

Alpha science toys have prepared more kits for children's physical science experiments, hoping to explore the world of science together through various interesting science experiment activities, so that children can grow up with happiness.


RECOMMENDED PRODUCTS

SEND US A MESSAGE
QUICK LINK
CONTACT US
Tel:+86-13223745050
Manufacturer:XinXiang Alpha Manufacturing Ltd
Address: West Of Bei Hean Road, Muye District,
 Xin xiangCity,He Nan Province,China,Post Code 453000
INQUIRY
   25133836dv5m 
TECHNICAL SUPPORT:COVERWEB
COPYRIGHT © XIN XIANG ALPHA MANUFACTURING LTD
All RIGHTS RESERVED